Beginner’s Break-In Routine – What Is It and Guidelines To Follow…

Beginner’s Break-In Routine

If you are new to strength training or have not performed strength training for 6 months or more, you would do wise to follow the break-in routine listed below.

This routine is designed to help you learn some of the basic movements, without have to worry about going to muscular failure.

Your form, as mentioned previously, is vital in getting the most out of the Fat Burning Furnace routines, and as with anything else…practice, practice, practice.

In the early stages of strength training, your body won’t be able to go to failure anyway, despite your greatest efforts.

The body must first learn how to take a particular exercise to failure, and you must learn what failure feels like. After a couple weeks of the beginner routine, you’ll be well on your way to stimulating maximum muscle and strength.

Break-In Routine Guidelines:

  1. Perform this routine 3 times per week, on an every other day schedule. (i.e. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, or Tuesday , Thursday, Sunday).
  2. Select a weight for each exercise that allows you to complete the io repetitions with a moderate amount of effort. We are not trying to go to failure here, we are concentrating on learning the movements and priming your body for the real workouts to come!
  3. Perform each exercise in a slow and controlled fashion…generally 2-3 seconds on the positive or lifting portion, and 3-4 seconds on the negative or lowering portion of the movement. Pause briefly after the positive portion (contracted position) and the lowering portion before repeating.

That’s it! After about 2 weeks on this routine, you’ll be ready to tackle the Beginners routine that follows, and be well on your way to creating the spark to ignite your fat burning furnace!

Beginner Routine Guidelines:

  1. Workout 3 times per week, on an every other day schedule, making sure to get at least i day of rest between workouts, and two days rest after the third workout of the week. (i.e. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, or Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday).
  2. The first week, perform the A workout twice (Monday and Friday) and the B workout once (Wednesday). The next week do the opposite and continue to alternate each week. Basically…A,B,A,B,A,B.
  3. Select a weight for each exercise that allows you to perform no more than 8-io repetitions with maximum effort, that is until you reach momentary muscular failure. You may select a weight that is too heavy or too light initially, causing you to fail at more than io or less than 8 reps. Don’t worry…just adjust the weight slightly during the next workout so that you are back in the 8-io range.
  4. Make sure to keep the exercises that work the largest muscle groups early in the workout, when you are freshest. Perform about 4-5 exercises for your lower body and about 7-8 exercises for your upper body.
  5. Perform each exercise in a slow and controlled fashion…generally 2-3 seconds on the positive or lifting portion, and 3-4 seconds on the negative or lowering portion of the movement. Pause briefly in the contracted position (after the lifting portion) and at the start of the movement.
  6. Utilize double progression. Strive to add i or more repetitions to each exercise at every workout. When you can perform io or more repetitions to failure with a particular resistance, increase the resistance by 2.5 to 5 pounds, forcing you back to the 8 rep range for your next workout.
  7. Train at a brisk pace. Try and keep rest between exercises to a minimum. A good target to shoot for is 3o seconds. At first, it will be difficult to achieve this, but after a couple of weeks you’ll become conditioned to working at this pace. Training like this will provide amazing cardiovascular benefits, in addition to the strength and muscle building. Plus, your routine will only take about 20-25 minutes to complete. Not a bad time investment for a strong healthy body!
  8. It is not necessary to do warm-up sets, as if the repetitions are performed slowly and under control as recommended, there is little or no risk of injury. The first few reps of the set actually provide a mini warm-up built in. If you must perform a warm-up set, do so only on the first exercise of the routine. If you perform subsequent warm ups you will cut short the cardiovascular benefits of moving from one intense exercise to the next.
  9. The exercises listed are not written in stone. You may substitute similar exercises or variations for the ones listed. For example, you could perform and incline machine bench press instead of a fiat barbell bench press. Or you could do a dumbbell deadlift instead of the barbell deadlift. You get the idea. Just make sure to keep the exercises that work the largest muscle groups early in the workout, when you are freshest, and perform 4-5 exercises for your lower body and 7-8 exercises for your upper body.

After a few weeks on the above Beginner routines, you’ll have grown stronger. Your body will start to adapt to the exercises that a few weeks ago were brand new.

To keep the body guessing and adapting, you’ll want to introduce some new exercises or variations of the same ones you’ve been performing in the first 4 weeks or so.

You’ll want to do this again after the next 4 weeks, and so on until you’ve completed an initial 12-week period.

You need not overhaul the routines completely every 4 weeks, just change a few exercises with their similar counterparts every 4 weeks, as noted in the exercise description section earlier.

If you followed these routines and guidelines as listed for the 12 week period, you’ll have built new levels of strength and muscular development, increased your body leanness and melted body fat, and conditioned your cardiovascular system.

I’ll also bet that you’ll be shocked at the progress you’ve made! Give yourself a pat on the back, these routines are hard work, and you’re reaping the benefits. Now you’re ready to continue your journey of a healthy and fit lifestyle.

But before you do, take a week off from your workouts. Kick back, and try and relax for 7 days. After this rest period, your body and mind will be fired up to get going again!

Though you may want to jump to the intermediate programs that lie ahead, but if you are still getting stronger on most exercises with the beginner routines, I’d recommend you go through another 12-weeks or so with the beginner routines and schedules.

Change up some of the exercises if you’d like…make it fun…just be sure to adhere to the principles and guidelines of proper weight training exercise mentioned above.

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